Maths

Geometry Shapes: Definition, Types, and More!

Geometry shapes: Definition, Types, and More!
Geometric shapes are one of the most interesting parts of Mathematics, especially if you love art and drawing. They are basically shaped with a fixed structure and mimic the objects we see in our day-to-day lives. However, the twist is that these shapes contain line segments, angles, curves, and surfaces. Also, these geometric shapes are further classified into different types.
Geometry is an essential concept of Mathematics. That is why we felt the urge to describe this concept in the easiest way possible for students to understand better. From definition to types to example, everything is included. Trust me; we are going to explain everything in the most understandable way possible. Keep Reading!

Definition of Geometric Shapes

Geometry shapes are figures containing line segments, curves, points, and angles further enclosed by a boundary. Each geometric shape has a name (circle, triangle, square, etc.), and they look like the objects we see in our daily lives. For example, a ball is a circle, a pizza slice is a triangle, and laptops can be rectangles.
Below, we are going to share the types and complete list of geometric shapes for students to learn conveniently. Read on!

Types of Geometric Shapes

We have two types of Geometric shapes in Mathematics: two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional geometric shapes. Here is a little bit of explanation for each type and what shapes they include:

Types of Geometric Shapes

Two Dimensional Geometric shapes:

2d geometric shapes are the ones that only contain an x-axis and a y-axis. Hence, they only have 2 dimensions and a flat surface. Here is a list of 2d geometric shapes

Circle:

A circle is a two-dimensional shape with a closed boundary. It has a round shape without any corners or lines. Examples of circles are coins, wall clocks, wheels, and the moon.

Triangle:

Just like a circle, the triangle is also a closed two-dimensional figure. However, it contains 3 sides. Examples of triangles are a triangular pyramid, pizza slice, and nachos.

Square:

Square is one of the most common two-dimensional shapes with 4 sides of equal length. Examples of a square are a chessboard, a Ludo board, keyboard keys, and floor tiles.

Rectangle:

A rectangle is just like a square and has 4 sides, but there is a twist. All sides are not equal; however, the length of opposite sides is equal.

Oval:

Oval is also a two-dimensional shape identical to a circle but still a little different: Its corners are a little bit elongated. Also, it has no straight lines or corners. Examples of the oval are an egg, watermelon, and a badminton racket.

Three Dimensional Geometric Shapes:

3d geometric shapes are the ones that have three dimensions: an x-axis, a y-axis, and z-axis. In 3d geometric shapes, the z-axis is the height of the object. Here is a complete list of three-dimensional shapes:

Cube:

A cube is one of the most interesting and common three-dimensional shapes. It is made with 6 squares of equal length and sides. Also, it has 6 faces, 8 vertices, and 12 edges. Examples of a cube are a Ludo Dice, an Ice Cube, and a Rubik's Cube.

Cylinder:

A cylinder is also a three-dimensional shape with two flat yet identical circular ends. Also, a cylinder has no vertices. Examples of cylinders are cans, gas cylinders, oil tanks, and a cell.

Cuboid:

A cuboid is a three-dimensional shape made with 6 rectangles. This means a cuboid has 6 faces, 8 vertices, and 12 edges. Examples of a cuboid are a matchbox, a book, a shoebox, and bricks.

Cone:

A cone is one of the most creative three-dimensional shapes; it has a flat circular base that keeps narrowing to the top to form a pointed edge. Examples of a cone are a party hat, ice cream cones, a funnel, and a Christmas tree.

Sphere:

A sphere is a 3d round shape with an x-axis, a y-axis, and z-axis. Also, a sphere is identical to a ball. Examples of a sphere are a football, a basketball, a Globe, and a lollipop.

Hemisphere:

A hemisphere is the half of a sphere. Examples of a hemisphere are bowls, igloos, cups, and ice cream scoops.
All these shapes are drawn with a curve, a line, or a line segment. You can make geometric shapes by joining line segments with each other. For example, you will get a rectangle by joining 4 line segments.

Complete List of Geometric Shapes:

Though we have explained and mentioned all the basic geometric shapes above, we are sharing a complete list so that you don't miss out on anything. This list of geometric shapes also contains information about vertices, faces, and sides.

Name

2D/3D

Edges

Vertices

Faces

Square

2D

4

4

None

Rectangle

2D

4

4

None

Triangle

2D

3

3

None

Circle

2D

Curved

0

None

Pentagon

2D

5

5

None

Hexagon

2D

6

6

None

Cube

3D

12

8

6

Cuboid

3D

12

8

6

Cone

3D

1

1

2

Cylinder

3D

2

0

3

Sphere

3D

Curved

0

1


Open and Closed Shapes

You know what a line segment is, right? It is that part that joins two points in a line; a point is a dot that is at the start of the line. These line segments can give us different geometric shapes, and they are classified into two categories: open and closed geometric shapes. Let's go through these two categories in detail now!

Open Geometric Shapes

Open geometric shapes are also known as incomplete or irregular shapes. Why? Because their starting and ending points don't meet with each other.

Open Geometric Shapes

Closed Geometric Shapes

Now, closed geometric shapes are what we call normal in geometry. In closed shapes, the start and endpoint of the line segment always meet with each other, forming a closed geometric shape. The meeting point of these geometric shapes is known as a "Vertex."
All the 2d and basic geometric shapes like squares, rectangles, circles, and triangles fall under this category.

Solved Examples of Geometric Shapes

Example 1: Which one of the following is an open figure?

Solved Examples of Geometric Shapes

Answer: Figure D is an open figure since its start and endpoint don't meet with each other.

Example 2: How many sides are there in a decagon?

1.) 10
2.) 9
3.) 8
4.) 11

Answer: 10. Because a decagon has 10 vertices and 10 sides.

Example 3: Name some geometric shapes with real-life examples?
Answer: Here is a list of different geometric shapes with their real-life examples:

  • Square: Cheese Slice and Bread slice.
  • Circle: Wheel and Coin.
  • Triangle: Bermuda Triangle and Pyramid.
  • Rectangle: Door and Bed.
  • Oval: Egg and Lemon.
  • Cube: Ice Cube and Lunch Box.
  • Cuboid: Cabinets and Match Box.
  • Sphere: Balloon and Football.
  • Cone: Party Hat and Traffic Cone.
Example 4: State the number of straight lines in these below-mentioned geometric shapes?
a) Triangle
b) Square
c) Rectangle
d) Circle

Answer:
a) 3 straight lines.
b) 4 straight lines of equal length.
c) 4 straight lines.
d) No straight lines.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What are the basic Geometric Shapes?
The basic geometric shapes are rectangle, circle, triangle, and rhombus.

What is a Polygon?
A polygon is a 2D plane figure with line segments only. Also, a polygon has no opened ends. Triangle, Rectangle, and Square are types of polygons.

Is circle a type of a polygon?
No. A circle can never be a polygon because it has curves. While on the other hand, polygon only contains lines.

Can a straight line be a geometric shape?
Yes, a straight line can be a 1 dimensional geometric shape with length only. 

Final Words

Geometry and geometric shapes are one of the most interesting subjects of Mathematics. They might be a little confusing, but super exciting when you understand. I hope this post helps you or your kids understand the concept of Geometric shapes. If not, then you don’t need to worry. You can always ask us for a professional maths tutor to clear your doubts. Doesn’t matter if your are a student or a parent, we are just a click away!

Find Top Tutors in Your Area


Find A Tutor

With over 3 years of experience in teaching, Chloe is very deeply connected with the topics that talk about the educational and general aspects of a student's life. Her writing has been very helpful for students to gain a better understanding of their academics and personal well-being. I’m also open to any suggestions that you might have! Please reach out to me at chloedaniel402 [at] gmail.com

LATEST POST